Disability, festivals and events, LGBT, Lifestyle

Read Rosie Jones transcribed interview with ‘While Disabled’

Simon Sansome:
Hello, my name’s Simon Sansome and welcome to While Disabled. Today I have the stand-up comedian, super supremo Rosie Jones.

Rosie Jones:
Hello.

Simon Sansome:
Hello, how are you today? 

Rosie Jones:
I’m very well, how are you?

Simon Sansome:
I’m very well. We’re in central London today doing this recording so we’re at The Hospital Club in Covent Garden and we’re on the roof terrace ’cause it’s the quietest place we could find.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah.

Simon Sansome:
So if you hear some workmen below us, you know the reason why. Let’s start off with your disability.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah.

Simon Sansome:
You have cerebral palsy.

Rosie Jones:
I do yeah but I got ataxic cerebral palsy and I got to say that because it’s the rarest kind-

Simon Sansome:
Okay. 

Rosie Jones:
So a pretty big deal.

Simon Sansome:
You like showing it off do you?

Rosie Jones:
Yeah, yeah, I’m one of the extra special ones.

Simon Sansome:
What happened at birth with cerebral palsy?

Rosie Jones:
What happened was when I was coming out my shoulder got stuck. 

Simon Sansome:
Okay. 

Rosie Jones:
But it was the ’80s and I was wearing shoulder pads. So that meant that I didn’t breathe for 15 minutes-

Simon Sansome:
Those damn ’80s shoulder pads.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah. 

Simon Sansome:
Yeah.

Rosie Jones:
So 15 minutes is a long time not to breathe.

Simon Sansome:
Okay. But that’s had an impact on your maneuverability and the way your body functions?

Rosie Jones:
Yeah so because I got ataxic CP that means that I’ve got low muscle tone so my muscles are very floppy so I’m like-

Simon Sansome:
[inaudible 00:02:10] you look floppy, you walk floppy.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah, yeah. I’m like a walking ragdoll. Whereas most people with CP, they have spastic cerebral palsy. We’re not allowed to say that word-

Simon Sansome:
No you’re not allowed to say spastic anymore are you?

Rosie Jones:
No, but actually it is a medical term to describe someone who has a high muscle tone. So that’s the complete opposite of me. So really I couldn’t be further away from a spastic.

Simon Sansome:
It’s like every time you say the word spastic you, it’s like you shouldn’t be saying this but, as you say, it’s a proper medical term.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah, yeah. It’s just annoying able-bodied people took it and tried to use it as an insult, it’s not.

Simon Sansome:
The reason obviously for While Disabled is to highlight issues and talk about things that you wouldn’t normally talk about. So now I’ve seen you walk obviously okay, you walk like you’re drunk.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah. 

Simon Sansome:
You look like you’re hammered, you’ve had a long night out and either you’ve got a really bad hangover or you look like you’re going to die and fall onto the floor.

Rosie Jones:
To be fair, it is 10 a.m. so I am drunk.

Simon Sansome:
So does it actually physically hurt? Are you actually in any pain?

Rosie Jones:
No. I think I am so lucky because a lot of people with CP are in pain but I’m not at all and it’s because my problem is my muscles are so relaxed, they’re like chilling out all the time so that isn’t painful at all. And I can’t explain it to anyone else but for me in my head, I know I’m in control-

Simon Sansome:
Yes.

Rosie Jones:
So although I look like I’m about to fall over, I’m not because I just know exactly how to lean my body. So to me it’s quite fluid and it’s only when I glance at myself in the mirror or in a shop window I’m like, “Oh bloody hell, I look like I’m about to fall over.” But in my head all I see is walking and I don’t know, it’s so weird.

Simon Sansome:
Yeah so your mind works absolutely fine, your body’s just a little bit slow.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah, yeah. 

Simon Sansome:
That’s basically how it is.

Rosie Jones:
I can do everything. Everything, just a little bit slower.

Simon Sansome:
And that’s ’cause obviously the connection between the brain and the muscles is deteriorated-

Rosie Jones:
Yeah, yeah.

Simon Sansome:
Okay. Now I would like to point out, you do use your disability to your advantage.

Rosie Jones:
Oh yeah.

Simon Sansome:
This is a quote from you, I got this off the internet, yeah, and it says, “Actually on purpose dribble when you’re on the bus so people will give you a seat.”

Rosie Jones:
Yeah. Yeah, why not. I just think some people think having a disability is a disadvantage. It’s not, it’s brilliant and why shouldn’t I milk it a little?

Simon Sansome:
‘Cause you do break down the barriers, you take the persona of disability and just throw it out the window.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah.

Simon Sansome:
‘Cause for those who are watching Celebrity Roast, yeah, you took on Alex Brooker-

Rosie Jones:
Yeah.

Simon Sansome:
And you called Alex Brooker crab boy ’cause he’s got the thing-

Rosie Jones:
Yeah, ’cause he looks like a crab.

Simon Sansome:
And then he said to you, “To stop ejaculation I think about you.”

Rosie Jones:
Yeah-

Simon Sansome:
You know-

Rosie Jones:
Which is untrue.

Simon Sansome:
It’s just, [inaudible 00:07:11] whole idea of persona it just breaks down the barrier of people with disabilities who think that people are vulnerable that think they can’t do things and here you are, Alex as well, and you’re saying fuck everyone else and just get on with it and just taking the piss out of everyone.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah, exactly. And I do think that’s the biggest misjudgment than disabled people get. They think they’re very serious and victims and I have just never felt like a victim-

Simon Sansome:
No.

Rosie Jones:
And I’m just me. And if I want to make fun of myself, I will.

Simon Sansome:
And why not?

Rosie Jones:
Yeah.

Simon Sansome:
I’ll take the fun out of you.

Rosie Jones:
Oh yeah, like-

Simon Sansome:
We were walking down the corridor and I said, “You look pissed.”

Rosie Jones:
Yeah. I do.

Simon Sansome:
Why do you think it’s [inaudible 00:08:20] people without disabilities to talk about or to talk to people with disabilities?

Rosie Jones:
I think it’s because they’re scared of the unknown.

Simon Sansome:
About what to say and how to approach it.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah, it’s a bit of a alien thing for them so they’re … it comes from a good place because they don’t want to offend people. And really to that I say just use your common sense. Don’t walk up to a disabled person you don’t know and say, “Hey up, you retard.” That’s not okay, do not think I’m so comfortable and go and just insult all disabled people but then again don’t feel like you can’t ask questions.

Rosie Jones:
You know what I say? I say able-bodied people should watch children, watch how children react to disability and certain situations because I’ve had four, five year old children coming up to me going, “Hello, what’s wrong with your legs?” Or, “Hello, why do you talk funny? And you can see their parents are absolutely mortified but no, they’ve seen me, they haven’t seen or heard anyone like me before so-

Simon Sansome:
And it’s the only way children learn about it is if they do ask questions.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah.

Simon Sansome:
So when people ask me what am I doing in my scooter, it’s usually young children, I’ll happily explain it.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah.

Simon Sansome:
Yeah.

Rosie Jones:
And that’s the thing. If you’re unsure, if you don’t know what to say or if you don’t know whether or not they need help, just ask.

Simon Sansome:
Yeah. Right so clearly you can stand up for yourself.

Rosie Jones:
Yes. 

Simon Sansome:
Okay. We know that, okay. What was it like standing up for yourself at school?

Rosie Jones:
Annoyingly I want to give you like a big sob story but school for me was brilliant, I really enjoyed it. And I do think [inaudible 00:11:56] I went to school at the perfect time because it was the early ’90s so they were getting rid of disabled schools so I was one of the first people to go to a mainstream school but then because it was a Labor government they had a lot of money to use on disabled people. So I actually was lucky enough to have a TA with me all the time throughout primary school. And she was brilliant, she was my best friend. And to the other kids, I wasn’t really disabled, I was Rosie. And I think I’ve always used comedy to my advantage-

Simon Sansome:
Do you think that’s where you got your confidence from? ‘Cause you are a very confident person.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah. Yeah, yeah I think so and I bet you talked about it before but I do think there’s a big difference between disabled people who were born disabled and disabled people who become disabled.

Simon Sansome:
There is a big difference ’cause I’m the latter. 

Rosie Jones:
Yeah, yeah.

Simon Sansome:
Yeah.

Rosie Jones:
But because I was born disabled I’ve never known any different so I’ve never felt nervous about what I can and cannot do and I’ve never felt upset about missing out. I explain it by saying what if you said to an able-bodied person, “Poor you, you can’t fly. How do you get anywhere without flying? Well do you miss having wings?” And it’s like no because they’ve never known how to fly so why would they walk round their world thinking, “Oh well it would be much better if I had wings.” I don’t miss something that I never had and I’ve always been confident about who I am and that comes from my mum and dad really, who brought me up and they never said that I couldn’t do anything. And I’ve always been determined, I’ve always been a stubborn little bugger. And my mum and dad, when I praised them on their parenting, they said, “No, all we did was say yes to you. It was you who said I want to move away. It was you who said I want to move to London. All we had to do was swallow all our worry and go okay, if you want to do that, you do that.”

Simon Sansome:
Yeah. So you know when people do come up to you and ask you what’s wrong with you, do you actually explain what cerebral palsy is or you just say it’s brain damage now? ‘Cause obviously a lot of people don’t know that cerebral palsy is brain damage.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah-

Simon Sansome:
Or do you say something really sarcastically, something funny saying, “I’m absolutely pissed.”?

Rosie Jones:
Well I think it depends who it is. So if it’s a child I’ll explain it simply. If it’s a drunk idiot being a bit patronizing I’ll probably give them a sarcastic answer but I’ve had it, it’s funny I’ve had it a few times with people that I’ve been friends with for years and they’ve only just plucked up the courage to go, “What is, what’s going on here then?”

Simon Sansome:
I’ve got family and friends who still don’t know that I’ve got spinal damage.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah, yeah, yeah. 

Simon Sansome:
And they just think either I’m fat or I’m overweight or I’m lazy rather than I can’t actually feel my feet or legs. 

Rosie Jones:
Yeah, yeah. And those conversations are my favorite because I then go into detail and I say brain damage caused by lack of oxygen during birth that made the part of my brain die. They’re good but yeah it’s usually during a drunken night where a very good friend has gone, “So tell me everything.” Because even my friends who I’ve known for years who are very intelligent people, they don’t know.

Simon Sansome:
You can Google you.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah.

Simon Sansome:
You’re on Wikipedia and it tells you what’s wrong with you.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah, the … yeah but I got friends … I had one friend who said to me, “So talk me through your drug regime.” And I was like, “Well weed in the morning, coke at night, what do you mean?” And she said, “Well how many drugs you take to help stimulate your muscles?” And I went, “None.” Like she thought I would had to take pills and medication to help me and she had no idea that I don’t. And a biggest misconception is also will your children have cerebral palsy? No. Well they might but that’d be a big coincidence. 

Simon Sansome:
Let’s move onto your career ’cause you are doing phenomenally well at the moment.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah it’s a bit funny, isn’t it?

Simon Sansome:
‘Cause you are world famous now.

Rosie Jones:
Am I?

Simon Sansome:
You are. The reason I know this is because me and my wife were sitting in a Chinese restaurant in Boston-

Rosie Jones:
Nice.

Simon Sansome:
In America. I’ll say Boston ’cause there is a Boston in Lincolnshire. And we’re sitting in Chinatown and we went to this completely random Chinese restaurant and we’re talking about the podcast, While Disabled, and who we’re interviewing. And we’re just talking about what questions are we going to ask, just planning it and so on and so forth. And the couple next to us went, “Are you talking about Rosie Jones the comedian who waves her arms around?”

Rosie Jones:
Oh really?

Simon Sansome:
Yeah.

Rosie Jones:
Oh.

Simon Sansome:
So yeah it was that clip, there’s a clip on YouTube where you explain how difficult it is for you to say cerebral palsy ’cause it’s got five syllables and why it’s really annoying is that people who are blind and deaf get one syllable.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah. Oh no way! I can’t believe that clip, it’s gone a bit mental.

Simon Sansome:
It’s gone … I mean Jimmy Carr’s going over there in a few weeks time, he’s doing the Boch Center and what I noticed very quickly that watching TV and watching the mainstream media over there, there is nobody with disabilities on TV or on show, stand-up comedians in America with disabilities so you are a notoriety over there. Taking the piss out of your disability, they’re not used to it. Where here we see you each week on TV and-

Rosie Jones:
Yeah. Well I think the UK should be better and there’s not nearly as many disabled people on TV than there should be but actually at least we’re getting there.

Simon Sansome:
It has started to change, hasn’t it? Slightly.

Rosie Jones:
It’s a lot better than America where they kinda hide them away. So my plan is to break the UK-

Simon Sansome:
I think you’ve kinda done that. 

Rosie Jones:
And then pop to America and I’ll just-

Simon Sansome:
The world.

Rosie Jones:
Blow their minds.

Simon Sansome:
Why not? You’ve performed at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival.

Rosie Jones:
I have.

Simon Sansome:
What was that like?

Rosie Jones:
So great. I [inaudible 00:23:26] my first hour there this year and I had the best time of my life but at the same time the worst time of my life because the listeners are probably thinking, “What is she moaning about? All she had do was work for an hour a day.” But it takes so much out of you to constantly perform for a whole hour and make sure that every show you give it your all and you don’t get ill and oh my God, the bloody cobbles. Everywhere.

Simon Sansome:
Yeah, before I was disabled like me and my wife went up to Edinburgh for an anniversary and we flew up there and didn’t notice it at all. And then we went up there again, a couple of years after I was disabled and I’ve got my scooter. Going on the cobbles is like getting a back massage from Satan.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah. So yeah it was amazing but yeah exhausting. And then you feel like everyday you’re getting judged ’cause you get reviewers in and you get compared to people, so-

Simon Sansome:
Yeah. But you also have a good time, let’s face it ’cause I’m guessing you get unlimited drinks while you’re there and a lot of your comedy mates are up there-

Rosie Jones:
Yeah, yeah.

Simon Sansome:
So you know.

Rosie Jones:
I did drink my fair share of Edinburgh gin so that was great. 

Simon Sansome:
So what’s up for you next, what are you doing now?

Rosie Jones:
So I’m mainly writing now. So I’m writing on two sitcoms and I’m gigging a lot. I’m probably gigging about five times a week and it sounds ridiculous because we’re recording this in November but I am thinking about Edinburgh next year because it takes a long time to write an hour.

Simon Sansome:
Oh I can believe it absolutely, yeah absolutely. For people who listen to While Disabled we have a couple of sections-

Rosie Jones:
Great.

Simon Sansome:
Okay, which are things that you should not say to a person with disabilities, okay. And this gets, we’ve had different reactions from different people. So for example I was interviewing Dan White whose daughter has got spina bifida and people say, “Aw dear, are you okay? Oh I feel sorry for you.” Or, “You’re so brave.” And the best one I’ve ever heard she’d come out with, I haven’t this, this is what Dan repeated to me, is she repeats now to everyone who says, “Aw dear, I feel sorry for you.” She says, “Why? I wasn’t in a war.”

Rosie Jones:
Yeah, yeah!

Simon Sansome:
It’s that kind of thing, it’s like telling them to you know-

Rosie Jones:
[crosstalk 00:27:07] 

Simon Sansome:
Yeah so I wanna see people who have come and said this to you.

Rosie Jones:
Oh yeah. 

Simon Sansome:
So this is what not to say to a person with cerebral palsy.

Rosie Jones:
Good.

Simon Sansome:
Okay. 

Rosie Jones:
Yeah.

Simon Sansome:
Yeah. “I’ll pray for you.”

Rosie Jones:
Oh my God yeah. Too many times. I had a moment a few months ago [inaudible 00:27:29] us permission to pray for you. And [inaudible 00:27:46] phones me and I went, “No.” And they said to me, “Can I ask why you won’t let us?” I went, “Because I don’t want it to work ’cause I like how I am.”

Simon Sansome:
Brilliant, brilliant.

Rosie Jones:
Imagine if it worked and I woke up able-bodied.

Simon Sansome:
You’d be less employable. You’ve got a uniqueness at the moment.

Rosie Jones:
I’d be like, “Oh bugger, that’s my whole career ruined.”

Simon Sansome:
Okay. Second one is, “Where’s your carer?” 

Rosie Jones:
Yes. 

Simon Sansome:
That’s a, yeah I get that one quite a lot.

Rosie Jones:
So many times.

Simon Sansome:
Yeah.

Rosie Jones:
Or I also get, “Are you lost? Can I help you find your carer?”

Simon Sansome:
Oh I know. I got-

Rosie Jones:
No. 

Simon Sansome:
On the way here this morning I got stopped saying, “Are you okay? Do you need assistance getting anywhere?”

Rosie Jones:
No.

Simon Sansome:
I’m going down the streets in my scooter and they stood out in front of me and said, “Can we give you assistance.” I said, “What with? Do you want to take me to the toilet?”

Rosie Jones:
No.

Simon Sansome:
I mean what do you want to help me with?

Rosie Jones:
Yeah. 

Simon Sansome:
Anyway, oh dear. 

Rosie Jones:
I know it comes from a great place but I’m annoyed when I get stopped ’cause when I’m on my own I get into a rhythm of how I walk and if I’m stopped it takes me so long to get back into that rhythm. I’m like, for God’s sake you’ve added ten more minutes.

Simon Sansome:
The next one is have you been asked, “Can you have sex?”

Rosie Jones:
Yes. 

Simon Sansome:
Yes. 

Rosie Jones:
So many times.

Simon Sansome:
Is it when people come and chat to you or try and chat you up, they’re thinking, “Do I need to chat you up, am I going to get lucky tonight or do I actually have to ask you if you can have sex or not?”

Rosie Jones:
Yeah I’ve had that but I’ve also had it a lot from friends or people that aren’t romantically interested. It’s like I want to say, “Why are you asking me? We’re not ever going to shag so why do you need to know?”

Simon Sansome:
Obviously we’ve talked about this one before is, “Are you pissed?” That’s, I’m guessing you get that on a daily basis, yeah.

Rosie Jones:
Every single day.

Simon Sansome:
Yeah. ‘Cause if you’re walking down the street you do look like an alcoholic. If you had a bottle of wine in your hand you’d probably be arrested.

Rosie Jones:
And I normally do to be fair. That’s fine but what annoys me more is people talking about me and pointing and going, “Oh she’s pissed.” Even if I was pissed I’m not deaf, don’t point at me. 

Simon Sansome:
Here’s another one for you, “Is it contagious?”

Rosie Jones:
No actually I’ve never had that but I wouldn’t answer them, I’d just cough all over them.

Simon Sansome:
Yeah, see if they catch it or not. 

Rosie Jones:
So I want that to happen.

Simon Sansome:
You look like you need help with that.

Rosie Jones:
Every-

Simon Sansome:
Every time, yeah. 

Rosie Jones:
All the time.

Simon Sansome:
Yeah, yeah. Or the other one is, obviously you get this as well, “Oh, poor you.”

Rosie Jones:
Yeah.

Simon Sansome:
I mean poor me what? You know.

Rosie Jones:
Oh more than that I get, “Aw, bless you. Oh, poor you.” No I don’t need your sympathy, I’m actually probably a lot more successful than you so-

Simon Sansome:
You shove it in their face.

Rosie Jones:
Actually poor you.

Simon Sansome:
Yeah. “Let me help you with that,” is another one we get.

Rosie Jones:
All the time. 

Simon Sansome:
All the time. Yeah, absolutely.

Rosie Jones:
But annoyingly I get it from family members. I get it from my nan all the time and it’s like, “Nana, you’ve known me for 28 years. You know that I can cut a steak on my own. Shut up.”

Simon Sansome:
The next round, the final round, is quick fire questions. Now-

Rosie Jones:
Great, I’m not very quick. 

Simon Sansome:
That’s all right.

Rosie Jones:
Is that all right?

Simon Sansome:
So these are based round your personality from me doing research-

Rosie Jones:
Great.

Simon Sansome:
Because you’ve done a lot of TV shows, you’ve worked on The Last Leg, you’re writing something for Netflix, yeah. You’ve also done another Channel Four show-

Rosie Jones:
Yeah 8 Out of 10 Cats.

Simon Sansome:
Oh that was it, 8 Out of 10 Cats with Jimmy Carr. Josh Widdicombe, Alex Brooker or Adam Hills, who’s you’re favorite?

Rosie Jones:
Oh you can’t make me do that.

Simon Sansome:
I bloody well can.

Rosie Jones:
They’re all great.

Simon Sansome:
Come on, pick one.

Rosie Jones:
Probably Josh.

Simon Sansome:
Josh. 

Rosie Jones:
‘Cause I-

Simon Sansome:
Right, I’m going to send this to Alex-

Rosie Jones:
No, no, no.

Simon Sansome:
I’m going to send this to Alex and Adam and they’re going to hate you for it.

Rosie Jones:
No don’t. I’m only saying Josh because Alex is in bad books because he insulted on Roast Battle.

Simon Sansome:
You understand the principle of Celebrity Roast Battle, don’t you?

Rosie Jones:
Yeah but he could have been a lot nicer and he didn’t need-

Simon Sansome:
You called him crab boy.

Rosie Jones:
He said I’m a walking waste of a pair of cracking tits. It’s not a waste.

Simon Sansome:
Yeah. 

Rosie Jones:
And Josh is lovely and funny and they’re all lovely.

Simon Sansome:
Is he single, Josh?

Rosie Jones:
No, he’s getting married-

Simon Sansome:
Oh is he?

Rosie Jones:
Which is very exciting.

Simon Sansome:
Excellent. Are you going?

Rosie Jones:
No, I don’t …

Simon Sansome:
Oh you haven’t been invited. Oh you need to put a word about that.

Rosie Jones:
Oh burn, burn.

Simon Sansome:
Okay. Right which one do you prefer, writing or stand-up?

Rosie Jones:
Ooh, writing.

Simon Sansome:
Writing.

Rosie Jones:
Writing. I would always say that that I’m a writer-comedienne in that order.

Simon Sansome:
That’s what I was going to ask next is acting or stand-up?

Rosie Jones:
Ooh, yeah, yeah. Stand-up more than acting but first and foremost I’m a writer who performs.

Simon Sansome:
Okay. Would you like to be fully abled or do, because obviously you don’t know any difference because you were born with it, would you like the experience of being fully abled or do you like the way you are?

Rosie Jones:
No. No.

Simon Sansome:
You like the way you are, yeah. 

Rosie Jones:
I love who I am and I think it’s affected who’ve I’ve grown into and I don’t really know who I would be if I was able-bodied.

Simon Sansome:
‘Cause it’s your identity now, isn’t it? Yeah.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah it’s my identity, my brand. And I think I’d be-

Simon Sansome:
You think you’re Nike.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah, yeah. I’m basically-

Simon Sansome:
Or Adidas, all day I dream about sex.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah, I’m basically a disabled Adidas.

Simon Sansome:
Were you on the Shaw Top 100 list?

Rosie Jones:
No.

Simon Sansome:
Why weren’t you on the Shaw Top 100 list?

Rosie Jones:
What is that?

Simon Sansome:
Oh it’s like the most influential disabled people in Britain.

Rosie Jones:
Why was I not on that?

Simon Sansome:
Alex Brooker was number one. 

Rosie Jones:
That … there’s 100 people more influential than me.

Simon Sansome:
I know and me. I’ve got my own podcast.

Rosie Jones:
[inaudible 00:36:48]

Simon Sansome:
I know. And you know what the worst thing is don’t you? The picture that he put up when that list came out is sat in front of him with like 10 pints of beer is, I sent him a message on Twitter saying, “How can you be the most influential disabled person in Britain when you’re always legless?”

Rosie Jones:
Yeah, that’s true. That’s so true.

Simon Sansome:
Who’s your funniest comedian?

Rosie Jones:
Ooh that’s hard. I know a lot and it changes every day. I think at the moment my favorite is Kerry Godliman. Every-

Simon Sansome:
I’m guessing people will be googling her once they hear this podcast.

Rosie Jones:
Oh they’ll know her, she’s quite big. So she’s my favorite British stand-up and then my favorite all time is a Canadian called Tig Notaro.

Simon Sansome:
Oh I thought you were going to say Catherine Ryan.

Rosie Jones:
No. Have you heard of Tig?

Simon Sansome:
No I haven’t, no. Which is embarrassing considering I’m a Canadian citizen as well.

Rosie Jones:
What are you doing? Get googling. She inspired me to start comedy actually because her style is so slow, she takes her time and she’s able-bodied but it made me go, “Oh my God that she’d adopted that as her style it shouldn’t matter that I speak slowly. I can use it to my advantage.”

Simon Sansome:
Favorite show?

Rosie Jones:
Favorite show. Putting me on the spot here.

Simon Sansome:
Well you’ve written a few, so-

Rosie Jones:
I have. Favorite show, I’d have to say the Royle Family.

Simon Sansome:
The Royle Family.

Rosie Jones:
I can watch that over and over again because it’s so simple and when it-

Simon Sansome:
And accurate. 

Rosie Jones:
So accurate and when it came out it just blew everyone’s minds because there hadn’t been anything like it before.

Simon Sansome:
Okay. Favorite actor? And don’t say yourself.

Rosie Jones:
No, without a doubt Tom Hanks. I love Tom Hanks.

Simon Sansome:
Oh dear. 

Rosie Jones:
Like I love-

Simon Sansome:
You look like you’ve got a little bit of drool coming out of the side of your mouth.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah, I always do though. I love him on a psychopathic level.

Simon Sansome:
Oh dear.

Rosie Jones:
I’ve seen all of his films.

Simon Sansome:
What even The Polar Express?

Rosie Jones:
Yeah.

Simon Sansome:
Oh that’s a terrible film.

Rosie Jones:
Right we’re ending the podcast now. He’s good to me, I’ve been in the same room as him twice and both times I was shaking even more than I shake normally.

Simon Sansome:
So even when you meet all the celebrities and you hang out with them you still get a bit of celebrity nervousness.

Rosie Jones:
Only with Tom.

Simon Sansome:
Oh okay.

Rosie Jones:
Only with my Tom.

Simon Sansome:
Yeah. 

Rosie Jones:
I could talk for a lot longer.

Simon Sansome:
I did notice, I know you can you could talk forever but I’m gonna stop you there because-

Rosie Jones:
[crosstalk 00:40:45]

Simon Sansome:
People will turn off if it gets boring.

Rosie Jones:
Yeah. Shall we do another hour all about Tom Hanks?

Simon Sansome:
I’m okay, thanks. You know I don’t really want to.

Rosie Jones:
Please. 

Simon Sansome:
Rosie Jones, you’ve been absolutely fantastic.

Rosie Jones:
Thank you so much.

Simon Sansome:
Thank you very much. This has been While Disabled, we’ll be back in a week’s time with another celebrity talking about disability. Thank you very much, Rosie Jones.

Rosie Jones:
Thank you, bye bye. 

To listen just click link.

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/while-disabled/id1450719718?mt=2&i=1000428877470

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